Tuesday, July 10, 2007

Tuesday Ten Trivia - The Allman Brothers Band


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This week’s Ten concentrates on the kings of southern rock (by far) who also brought a tinge of psychedelia to their act:

Duane Allman played on whose 1971 debut album (produced by Rolling Stone publisher Jann Wenner)?

Where and when did the Allman Brothers Band record its first live album (venue and year)?

Name one of the two inspirations for the album title Eat A Peach.

Both Duane Allman and Berry Oakley died in motorcycle accidents within a year of each other. What else is coincidental about their deaths?

Chuck Leavell, Lamar Williams and Jai Johnny Johanson went on to form what band?

Duane Allman was the primary session guitarist at what studio?

TRUE or FALSE: When Gregg Allman’s personal manager was busted for drugs, Gregg testified on his behalf.

What occupation did Gregg Allman plan to pursue prior to the formation of the Allman Brothers Band?

What Muscle Shoals soulman began calling Duane Allman “Sky Man”?

Who is Elijah Blue?

16 comments:

Joe the Troll said...

Elijah Blue is Gregg and Cher's son.

Miz UV said...

"Do I dare to eat a peach?" is a line from a famous pome -- T.S. Eliot's The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock -- so I'll guess that.

O' Tim said...

*Bing* - I guess Cher wore him out, thus the spaghetti nap.

*Bing* - The other inspiration was from a Georgia travel ad.

NOTE: correction to question #9

O' Tim said...

Just came across a third inspiration for the album title. According to the DA bio on Wikipedia, They named Eat a Peach for Duane's response to the question "How are you helping the revolution?": "There ain't no revolution, only evolution, but every time I'm in Georgia I eat a peach for peace, a two legged Georgia Peach."

A peace indeed.

Jeff said...

DA played with Clapton, that what you're talking about in #1?

Natsthename said...

I always heard that one inspiration was that Duane's wreck was with a peach truck. That's the only one I know of!

Natsthename said...

First live album...At The Fillmore East, which is ONE KICKIN' ALBUM. I think 1971 or 72. There is some live thing with a date of 1970 that was released in the 90's, but I don't think that counts, does it?

O' Tim said...

Jeff - No.

Nat - Nah, it were a flatbed lumber truck. You're correct on the Fillmore (both date, March 1971, and fact that it is a kickin' album.) I'm not familiar with your reference to something from 1970.

I think one of the most amazing things in rock music is that Duane was only 24 years old - rated on the Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Guitarists list as second only to Hendrix, himself only 27 at his untimely death.

Man, the "what ifs" of it all...
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Natsthename said...

Yeah, but then they'd have been on that VH1 "Behind The Music" and it'd be something we make fun of. It's almost a blessing that they died young. Almost.

Natsthename said...

ohhh this is the album I'm talking about...

"Live at Ludlow Garage 1970 features 91 minutes of the Allman Brothers Band in concert at a Cincinnati venue that they loved, nearly a year before their legendary Fillmore shows." Looked it up at allmusic. It's got 4 1/2 stars, too. Perhaps I'll check it out!

Joe the Troll said...

"Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Guitarists list as second only to Hendrix"

A useless list from a useless magazine.

Anonymous said...

Where and when did the Allman Brothers Band record its first live album (venue and year)? The first live recording released was "At Fillmore East," recorded March 1971 and released that Summer, while "At Ludlow's Garage" was recorded in April 1970, but released in 1990.

Name one of the two inspirations for the album title Eat A Peach.
Anything about motorcycle wrecks shows ignorance, and promoting a urban legend. The title came from Duane's comment about the revolution.

Both Duane Allman and Berry Oakley died in motorcycle accidents within a year of each other. What else is coincidental about their deaths?
They took place about three blocks from each other.

Chuck Leavell, Lamar Williams and Jai Johnny Johanson went on to form what band? Sea Level.

Duane Allman was the primary session guitarist at what studio?
Duane was not the primary guitarist at Fame. There were three others, but Duane became in demand after suggestion to Pickett that he record "Hey Jude."

TRUE or FALSE: When Gregg Allman’s personal manager was busted for drugs, Gregg testified on his behalf.
He actually testified before a grand jury, not a trial.

What occupation did Gregg Allman plan to pursue prior to the formation of the Allman Brothers Band? Dental surgeon.

What Muscle Shoals soulman began calling Duane Allman “Sky Man”?
Pickett
Who is Elijah Blue?
Gregg's son with Cher.

Natsthename said...

"Anything about motorcycle wrecks shows ignorance, and promoting a urban legend." Well. excuuuuuuuuse me for being ig'nernt and promotin' a urban legend. Thanks for the edumucation.

O' Tim said...

Good job, whoever you are.

On the FAME studios thing - good to know!

On the Grand Jury thing - it's true one does not testify before a GJ as a witness for or against an arrestee, however, the "False" aspect is that Gregg's testimony was NOT favorable to Scooter. So we split hairsez.

And to wrap it up, Duane played on Boz Scaggs' eponymous 1971 album. CORRECTION: this was not his debut album.

'Til Tuesday...

Natsthename said...

Hey, Rolling Stone was great back in the day. In fact, it was great until sometime in the mid-80's, when they just totally lost me. I don't even recognize that mag anymore. I'll stick with Paste (although that one's teetering on appealing to the masses at this point..sad), Harp, Mojo, or Q. I also dig No Depression.

Joe the Troll said...

1987 is when they started to lose me. First, every damn issue had something to do with Springsteen. Then I read an abominable review of a Dead show. The writer noted that they played Touch of Grey, and was surprised that people were singing along with it even though the album had only been released the day before. A knowledgeable writer would have known that they'd been playing that song for years prior to recording it.

Another thing was the review of Pink Floyd's "The Division Bell", where the reviewer noted sadly that the album was kind of mellow. Imagine that. A mellow Pink Floyd album. Just like every one that preceded it. He obviously wasn't familiar with their albums, just their radio hits.

I don't read any mags anymore. I just read liner notes, and write. I haven't heard of a couple that you mention, maybe I'll check them out.